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Ways to Help You Get The Right Basketball Hoops

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

One of the first considerations when considering a basketball goal is the backboard. Do you want glass or Acrylic? Aside from some wooden backboards, these two materials are the most widely used in a backboard construction. A regulation size glass backboard is 72-inches across, 42-inches high and about a ½-inch thick, while the backboards commonly used in school gymnasiums the world over are typically 40- to 60-inches in height and length, respectively.

Moreover, a basketball backboard should produce an even after-bounce. In other words, the ball should reflect from the backboard at an even and straight bounce. Essentially, the less dead spots, the better the backboard quality. Additionally, a glass backboard should be framed in either stainless steel or aluminum, the latter being the choice of most regulation committees. Should you, on the other hand, choose a regular acrylic backboard, square, semi-circular, and fan shapes are all available on the market. Most retailers suggest that bigger is better, and depending on your individual needs, various sizes, choices, colors and team themes are obtainable.

The next piece of some significant consequence in how to buy a basketball hoop is the rim. Assuming that your needs are for home play, you’ll need a rim that is properly fitted for the backboard you choose. Many rims have oval holes drilled to fit various backboards dimensions allowing for universal installation.

All regulation rims are 18-inches in diameter and mounted at a 15-inch space from the center of the rim to the front of the backboard. The choice, then, comes down to the spring (or non-spring) mechanisms. These are known as breakaway (or classic-style) rims. Breakaway rims are often composed of two to three springs that give away should you miss a shot or attempt a slam-dunk. Classic-style rims connect to the backboard without springs and will not give. Your best choice scenario is to buy a rim that will hold up to your style of play. The rim you choose will either be your best friend or your worst enemy, sanctioning the great “W” for your 3-on-3-driveway championship, or causing the big “L” with a jolting brick (W= Win L=Lose).

If questioning how to buy a basketball hoop, it’s of utmost importance to consider the pole and adjustment mechanism. Regulation and maximum offset-the space between the out-of-bounds line and the bottom of the backboard-is four feet. The farther the distance, the greater safety zone you have between the players and the pole holding up the basket. Most home courts roughly incorporate a 24-inch offset to best maximize driveway length and width, allowing for a free-throw line or even a three-point line.

After deciding your own safe pole offset, you should then choose which type of pole you would like: there’s one-, two-, and three-piece poles. The construction and placement differs, as does the mounting systems. Poles use various widths and shapes, some round and a few inches in diameter, while others are square shaped with larger diameters providing more strength. The mounts are almost always placed in concrete, either using a pre-fabricated housing sleeve or underground J-bolts. (You can also buy a portable basketball hoop, which is often filled with either sand or water for transportable basketball play).

Because a family’s needs grow and change, adjustable basketball hoops have become widely popular. These goals are great for families with varied age and size distribution amongst their children. Adjustable basketball hoops come in two styles: crank or pneumatic (gas) systems.

If you’re interested in long-term durability coupled with accuracy, then the crank adjusting mechanisms are rated higher. These systems are generally harder to raise and lower, but provide robust resilience against wear and tear. A pneumatic system, contrarily, is easier to adjust. These systems are just as strong as the crank systems, but after a few years commonly leak air (or gas), making the hoop not quite as accurate as the crank counter part in the long run. Though different prices may help you make a choice in buying a basketball hoop, it’s crucial to choose an adjusting system that will fit your exclusive needs.

This information should aid in the all-important question in purchasing a basketball hoop for your home and family. However, apart from the hoop system itself, one should consider the company: Who has the best customer service? Which offers the best warranty? Who replaces parts and delivers in an efficient and effective manner?

Online Shopping Guide

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Stay away from fishy-looking sites. You can’t always tell when a website isn’t legitimate, but red flags include poor design, a strange or nonsensical Web address, and multiple pop-up windows you can’t close. If you notice any of these suspicious signs, stop shopping and close your browser windows.

Avoid clicking on hyperlinks embedded in emails. The Better Business Bureau warns that legitimate businesses don’t send emails asking for follow-up financial information. If an email, even one that claims to be from a familiar retailer, asks you to visit an outside site, don’t do it — it could be redirecting you to a scam site. Instead of clicking on a hyperlink, key the Web address that you want to visit into your browser manually.

Shop on secure websites only. Adam Levin, the founder of Credit.com and Identity Theft 911, suggests looking for “https” instead of just “http” in the address bar. Also, he adds, be sure your computer’s anti-virus software is up to date, since you may come across viruses when surfing online for deals and good buys.

Never, ever give your Social Security number to anyone online. If a site asks for it during the checkout process, it’s probably a scam site, says Levin.

Take advantage of the automatic identity-theft protection that comes with many credit cards. That’s one reason to use your credit card instead of debit cards or cash while shopping. If you see erroneous charges on your statement, you can call your credit card company, which should investigate on your behalf.
The Better Business Bureau points out that credit card companies are required to allow shoppers to dispute charges, and many companies cover charges made on stolen cards. Check your credit card statements frequently (don’t wait until you get your monthly bill); many card companies have time limits for disputing charges.

Change up your passwords. With consumers asked to remember dozens of passwords for various retailers, banks and accounts, it’s almost impossible to remember them all, especially since they often include mixes of numbers and letters. Either keep careful track in a secure document, rely on mnemonic devices to boost your memory, or come up with some other clever strategy — but don’t stick with simple passwords that are easy to guess.

Review your rights. The Better Business Bureau reminds shoppers that if products aren’t shipping on time, consumers have the right to cancel the order and get a refund. They can also reject merchandise they deem defective or misrepresented.

Wield that cellphone carefully. Security firm BitDefender reports that shopping with mobile devices can come with its own set of security challenges, since shortened URLs can more easily trick shoppers into visiting harmful sites. Also, public Wi-Fi access is convenient, but it can leave your personal information accessible to hackers, so avoid entering passwords and credit card numbers while in public hotspots.

Avoid strangers on social media. Although many retailers use social media to drum up business, sometimes their accounts get hacked and you’re sent a dangerous message or tweet designed to look legitimate. Fraudsters also send malicious messages through social networks. BitDefender recommends treating messages from strangers as spam — just ignore them.

Don’t click on fake e-cards. E-greetings are welcomed by most people, but the security firm AppRiver says fake cards can spread viruses. It recommends that consumers delete cards that come from unfamiliar addresses